Anti-Gun Bills: The Short View

I don’t believe that the Democratic majorities in the House and Senate have any interest in protecting rights that they don’t think are important — in particular, the right to keep and bear arms for self-defense, whether against criminals, or against the state.

But I do believe that they are interested in power — that is, in being able to tell people what to do, with the expectation that those people will feel compelled to do it.

Which is why they should recognize that when they pass — or even bring up for consideration — bills  that force people to choose between constitution and statute, between freedom and legality, between rights and compliance, they are undermining their ability to use the law to control people.  Because a great many people will — understandably, and properly — choose constitution over statutes, choose freedom over legality, and choose rights over compliance, even though that will make them criminals.

And here’s the thing about being a criminal.  Once you’re intentionally breaking some laws, it seems kind of pointless to worry about what other laws you might be breaking.  So a legislature that doesn’t want people to become accustomed to ignoring the laws it passes, should take care not to pass laws that people are certain to ignore