Can We Vote in the Upcoming UNH Student Elections?

UNH CampusUNH has elections coming up at the end of March.

From Tuesday, March 27th to Thursday, March 29th the Student Body will come together to vote for their next student leaders! The 2018 Student Body General Election will elect the next Student Body President/Vice President and Student Trustee. The election ballot will also have up to 5 referendum questions, which will ask the Student Body’s opinion on matters related to policy, academics, student life, and other areas of University affairs.

And guess what? You can’t vote in that election unless you are a student of UNH.

UNH General Election procedures.

1. Voting Location a) Voting will take place on wildcatlink.unh.edu or blackboard.com or mycourses.unh.edu

2. Voting Method a) Votes shall be cast using a ranked ballot.

3. Eligibility of Voters a) All undergraduate students of the University of New Hampshire shall be eligible to vote in the General Elections

You have to be logged in to your account which means you are using your student ID number.

Students from other universities or other state systems can’t vote in UNH student elections. They can’t decide their referendums.

But what if someone feels like they are a UNH student or they intend to become one in the near future? Sorry, you have to pay the poll tax (tuition) to vote in their elections even though it is a well know fact that out-of-state tuition-paying college students are encouraged to tip political elections in New Hampshire. This violates federal law, but no one from the political parties to the Sec.of State to the NH AG gives a damn. In Fact, they rubber stamp it at every opportunity.

Every effort to try and keep these vote-stealers honest is met with outside money and a massive propaganda campaign about stealing rights.

What they are doing is giving them more rights than you as an actual state resident have.

People from other states, most of them Students in the State College System, get to decide our budgets and pick our representatives. They can choose to vote here or in their own state, a right you don’t have.

So why can’t we decide their school elections for them? Because UNH has rules that they enforce.

You have to register as a student. Pay your tuition. Meet certain academic criterion. Or you are out the door. No voting for you. And if you want to be blessed with the in-state resident tuition discount, significant savings over the non-resident costs,  you can’t just be here or say you are thinking about being here.

To qualify for In-State tuition status a student [or his/her parents if a dependent] must physically reside in New Hampshire for no less than twelve continuous months prior to the term for which In-state status is desired, must reside in New Hampshire for some purpose other than attending the University, and meet all the other requirements of the tuition rules.

UNH Students can vote from anywhere, but they have to be students. This is also true in a regular election. You can vote from anywhere, using an absentee ballot, but you have to be a resident of the state whose ballot you are voting. The place that defines you as a student who must pay non-resident tuition to UNH.

Unless you are voting in New Hampshire.

The Democrat party, their campaign apparatus, even their elected officials, are telling people who live, work, and pay taxes in other states, that they can steal your elections.

If you don’t stand up and do something about it, they will continue to steal your elections, vote to spend your money, decide your warrant articles and constitutional amendments, and then go home, never having to pay the cost or live with the consequences.

Thousands of these individuals are deciding your tax rate and choosing who represents you year after year, in New Hampshire and in Washington. They can even help decide how much of your money goes to what amounts to tuition relief for them.

UNH has rules they enforce for a reason. It would not be fair for non-students to decide student elections.

It’s also not fair to allow non-resident students and non-residents to decide our elections but not only do they do it political people and political institutions allow it, and defend it.

That has to stop.