Notable Quote – Newt Gingrich

by Skip

“I think the gap in the country right now is that deep and that real. I think the people on the left have a radically different vision of America’s future than traditional Americans. And I think there’s a small element on the right – which has been there for a long time – which is genuinely crazy.

And let me say this, as a historian, Nazism was an anti-Christian, totalitarian, anti-Semitic evil. Any person who tells you that they are a neo-Nazi is telling you they’re signing up for evil. And I think we have every right as a country to decide that we’ll do everything we can to make it impossible to have an effective Nazi movement in this country, just as we should have an effective anti-Ku Klux Klan movement, which is focused, in a way, against Americans.”

-Newt Gingrich (former Speaker of the US House, Professor, Historian, author, speaker)

(H/T: Fox News)

Always remember, Nazi  was the abbreviation of Nationalsozialist – National Socialism.  A creature of the Left and not the Right.

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  • kervick

    Of course, but do not equate Nazi with alt right.

    • Bryan W

      I saw a short article somewhere yesterday (I forget where, sorry) that said (from memory) that there are two groups that have been labeled “alt-right” and there is a blurry place in the middle of them. One group is small, consists of the neo-Nazi’s and other white supremacists, and is very vocal. The other group is largely conservative, pro-Constitution, America First, Build the Wall, could care less about the GOP, etc. but are not engaged – much less vocal. Breitbart largely covers the second group, but there were voices that “coddled” the first group – Milo is one such voice. Which one does the media pay attention to?

      We aren’t going to reclaim the term, but we need to redefine and rename who the good “alt-right” are.

      • kervick

        Well, we are moving the Overton window. There are two loose alt right groups and they have been at odds with each other recently. One group, the alt right, believes racial identity is the core issue. They are fighting white erasure. The other group, the alt light, does not believe race is a central issue. They are social justice fighters. Nazi’s are a completely different breed. They are national socialists, fascists, who tend to be anti anything that is not WASP. There is another factor that is very controversial. Some in the alt right and even some in the alt light believe in what the call the “JQ”. That is the belief that powerful Jews in banking, entertainment, and psychoanalysis have been working against the interest of non-Jews, and that they use their victim status to shield themselves from criticism. I actually know a lot of Ron Paul type Libertarians that also believe this. Most alt right people are also traditional conservatives, because they support European religious Christian values. Thus there is lots of room for alt right and conservatives to come together. Pat Buchanan comes to mind.

        • Bryan W

          This just tells me that “alt-right” is a term with no real definition. Everyone has their own opinion of what it is. Which makes it the perfect boogyman for the leftists.

          I don’t believe the Vast Jewish Conspiracy theory, though there is something about Jews who act against their own interest as much as they act against ours. Schumer is the arch-type.

          • kervick

            The definitions are actually pretty tight. Some guy used the term alt right once and Richard Spencer is the guy that picked up on the term, so he really “owns” the usage. This is a powerful quote from Spencer that I support: “We have demoralized ourselves and
            moralized non-whites. We have become obsessed with the other. We have a
            guilt complex in our hearts that is hanging over us, that has lead us to
            become a dying people.

            My
            way out of this is not just to embrace individualism or fairness. My
            way out of this is for us to truly embrace who we are. The white race is
            ultimately not about fairness or individualism, or constitutionalism or
            legality. We need to embrace our Faustian spirit – our will to be
            great, our will to dominate, to be the best.”

            The other guy in the United States who can claim an alt right pedigree is Jared Taylor from American Renaissance (although he is mum on the JQ). Their membership is exploding as more and more people take the red pill. His schtick is race realism, and he does a great job explaining that concept.

            Pay Buchanan is quietly alt right. He has always done a great job tiptoeing around race realism and the JQ, so as to stay in the mainstream.

            Another factor is that European alt right tends to be ethno-nationalism while some US alt right tend toward civic nationalism because we have a stronger sense of civic (national) identity than most European countries. The European Alt right folk have no use for civic nationalism at all. They see that as alt light at best.

      • granitegrok

        Be careful, Bryan. In the Alt-Right, I would put both the neo-Nazis and white supremacists but that’s it. THat other group is just Right – which the MSM and the Left are trying to paint the rest of us as being kith and kin with these real racists.

        • Bryan W

          Which makes more sense to me. That isn’t the impression I get from the media.

        • kervick

          Yes, the media is using Rules for Radicals as they always do. They are trying to isolate and marginalize the alt right, but of course the alt left is perfectly excellent in their minds.

        • allen

          from every measure I can use, the “alt right” isn’t actually “right”. it’s “failed left”. every one of them is a failed left wing idea.

  • Nick Martin

    Kevin I think makes a good point. “We” (whomever he’s referring to there) is indeed trying to move the Overton window — attempting to move traditionally unacceptable concepts like racism, misogyny and anti-Semetic conspiracy theories within the realm of the mainstream right. I’m less concerned about how you define alt-right and more concerned with how certain sub-segments of the right are aiming to influence the mainstream to accept traditionally radical ideas. They attempt to legitimize blatant racism under the guise of being “pro-white.” This racial superiority concept was, of course, central to Nazi identity and is making a dangerous comeback — regardless of whether these people identify as neo-Nazis or subscribe to original Nazi socialist principals.

    • Ed Naile

      Nick has a point.
      Look how well progressives have adopted the legitimization communism.
      It was a slow process many long-time traditional Democrats still fail to see.
      Like socialists who have a problem with the term NAZI – you can lead a socialist to what socialism really is – but he won’t think.

      • Nick Martin

        Ed, so nice of you to join this conversation. Please, I’d love to hear if you have anything productive to say about white nationalists or whether you’ve just dropped by to change the subject?

        • Ed Naile

          I just made a point you don’t want to admit.
          The terms liberal, progressive, the Left, Marxists, etc. have stuck on our anti-America friends because enough people have seen what they really stand for. Maxine Watters comes to mind. (What a gift.)
          Good old-fashioned Democrats have turned away from the hard left in large numbers and trying to invent a label like alt-right to smear any and all opposition is a bit late.
          Conservatives have been called racists for so long that the children of Alinsky have almost cried themselves to sleep like tired babies hoping for a second wind.
          By the way. I don’t know any alt-right racists and I travel in some conservative circles. You would assume I would have my finger on the pulse of a movement like that.
          Can you name some here in NH – since you are an expert.

          • Bruce Currie

            Re: I don’t know any alt-right racists…” Richard Spencer is credited with popularizing the term, and I believe he fits the definition of ‘racist’ rather well. Here in NH, judged by some of his words above, Mr. Kervick seems to walking a narrow line to avoid between labeled such, and I think the moderator would agree.

          • Nick Martin

            Ed, please take a few minutes to watch videos on Kervick’s YouTube channel. It’s hard to argue that supporting neo-Nazi fight clubs and white supremacist ideologies is anything but racist. And remember, YouTube already removed his overt hate speech.
            But maybe you’re having a hard time accepting reality after being “red pilled” as he so eloquently put it in a prior post.

  • Tom F

    While these groups have been around a long time, they have recently become more vocal and more active – where’s the money coming from to drive that? I think Soros is funding all sides that will agree to be disruptive to tear at our social fabric. Groups post ads on Craigslist and elsewhere offering $25/hr for protesters – attractive to the unemployed fringe with an itch for any kind of adventure and “social relevance.”

    • Nick Martin

      Heh… I hope you realize the alt-right’s obsession with blaming Soros has anti-Semitic roots. This is exactly how the Overton window is moving. One small (seemingly benign) step at at time.

      It’s not more money that’s emboldening them, it’s the mainstream right’s unwillingness to deem their behavior unacceptable. And that won’t change as long as folks like you refuse to believe that these people exist as a grassroots hate movement.

      • Tom F

        Oh, they’re there, all right, and always have been – having been goaded into action by seeing the tolerance of the revolutionary tactics of the left – who also have always been there. Identity politics works both ways. I don’t refuse to believe they exist, nor do I tolerate these tactics on either side; if you do tolerate either side, be careful what you wish for. But as for Soros, I believe the only part of him that was ever really Jewish were his parents.

        • Bruce Currie

          Re: “having been goaded into action…” Right. Tell that to the ghost of Emmett Till, or the families of the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing.

          • Tom F

            So you can name two tragedies that were 40 years apart – there were lots more; but you’re looking too narrowly. As I said, there have always been, and always be, bad people, evil people, and then, there have always been revolutionary groups – but that takes money and organization, and in case you haven’t noticed, they have been ramping up their activities lately; someone, or some group, is doing this to weaken the USA. Russia doesn’t benefit from an unstable world, so it’s unlikely them – take a good look at who stands to benefit from political instability. Who is really behind those ads in Craigslist that I hear about, offering money for protesters?

          • Bruce Currie

            Would you post a link to “ads in Craigslist…offering money for protestors”?

          • Tom F

            I hear about that on other boards – they don’t advertise around here – too remote, too conservative. Try searching. You probably have more time.

  • Bruce Currie

    Nazism was a creature of the left, not the right? Really. I’ve seen this claim here several times, and it’s not accurate. Nazism was totalitarian, just as Soviet communism was. But it’s disingenuous to think that such a movement can’t emanate from the right–as Nazism did. Communists in the labor movement were among the first of Hitler’s opponents to be rounded up. And Hitler had the invaluable support of wealthy industrialists as he promised to make Germany great again.

    Sometimes forgotten is the extent to which pre-war South race laws were used as a model by the Nazis, who took the South’s race laws and restrictions and applied them to Jews, Romany, and other undesirables of the state. Confounding the issue of left and right is the fact that John C. Calhoun is called “the Marx of the Master Class”. He regarded labor as the enemy of entrenched interests north and south, while also believing that labor was the source of all wealth. But he was looking through the other end of the class lens. Many of the sentiments Calhoun expressed are expressed today by Libertarians, often unwittingly. His vision was of an America with a landed aristocracy that exalted property rights above all else, enabling slavery to survive to support vast concentration camps–er…plantations. Calhoun also believed that a condition amounting to Indentured servitude would be the necessary lot for the rest of the populace, as the best way to prevent them getting democratic ideas–keep them dumb and stupid, while of course reminding them they were superior to blacks. In his mind, this would preserve “liberty” for the propertied class, which is all the liberty that mattered in his mind. Not unlike what libertarians of today believe–the Kochs, Peter Thiel, and the rest of the right wing oligarchs who bankroll the Republican Party.

  • Ken Helmlinger

    Richard Spencer coined the term Alt-Right to describe the White Surpremist sector of the Far-Right

    National Socialism; was socialism in Name only. It was Fascism…. which is Far Right

    Far-Right and Far-left, both Fail the people and only in rich the Government Elite

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