This is why Canada and England have better health care systems than we do!

by Tim Condon

Looking at the following statistics tell us exactly why the federal government should be running health care!

Today America has a health care system that’s privately funded instead of government-funded, and our system involves private decisions instead of government decisions. 

That’s bad, bad, bad! The following statistics show how much better off we’ll all be if the government takes over health care. Woo-hoo! Check it out:


A recent "Investor’s Business Daily" article provided very interesting statistics from a survey by the United Nations International Health Organization.

Percentage of men and women who survived a cancer five years after diagnosis:
U.S.               65%
England         46%
Canada          42%

Percentage of patients diagnosed with diabetes who received treatment within six months:
U.S.               93%
England         15%
Canada          43%

Percentage of seniors needing hip replacement who received it within six months:
U.S.               90%
England         15%
Canada          43%

Percentage referred to a medical specialist who see one within one month:
U.S.               77%
England         40%
Canada          43%

Number of MRI scanners (a prime diagnostic tool) per million people:
U.S.               71
England         14
Canada          18

Percentage of seniors (65+), with low income, who say they are in "excellent health":
U.S.               12%
England           2%
Canada            6%

Leave a Comment

  • Paul

    “Today America has a health care system that’s privately funded” – this is less than half true. Governments directly pay for close to half (46.5%) of all health care in the US, and further subsidize it through tax policy. (Canada’s governments fund 70.2%, the UK’s 82.6%)
    Per capita government spending on health ($, PPP):
    Canada 2863
    UK 2585
    US 3507
    Per capita total health spending ($, PPP):
    Canada 4079
    UK 3129
    US 7538
    (All data from the OECD.)
    Clearly, outcomes in the US are far superior to those in Canada and the UK. We also subsidize the rest of the world, in that our pharma companies amortize their R&D expenses here. But to say that our system is privately funded is (unfortunately, IMO) incorrect.
    Another interesting statistic is how much of health care is paid out-of-pocket, because this is where there’s an actual market. In other words, this number should be as high as possible.
    Canada 14.7%
    Germany 13.0%
    Israel 29.7%
    Japan 14.6%
    Switzerland 30.8%
    UK 11.1%
    US 12.1%
    According to the OECD, only three countries are lower than the US, and 23 are higher. I think this helps explain why health care in the US is so expensive.

  • Paul

    Ugh – sorry for the ugly post. I had it nicely formatted, with tabs and everything – but all formatting was stripped away…

  • http://www.meetup.com/capitalarea912/ Richard A. Bloom

    I am a 6 year plus Pancreatic Cancer Survivor. Less than 1,000 new cases of Pancreatic cancer is reported each year. As a result not very many Hospitals are actually setup or have the experts to help the Patient. Living in NH we are very close to Boston where Mass General Hospital is the nations #1 rated medical facility in the north eastern region of the United States.
    Because we currently have the freedom to pick and chose our Doctors I was able to get the best of medical care and specialists under the umbrella of MGH in Boston, MA. My chance of being alive is less than 1% at this juncture. Any interference by government officials I would be dead right now and just another statistic. I will require specialized treatments in Boston at MGH for the rest of my life in order to live. If Obamacare gets any traction at all, I would no longer be able to see my Health care team in Boston and life as I know it would end.

  • http://www.meetup.com/capitalarea912/ Richard A. Bloom

    I am a 6 year+ survivor of Pancreatic cancer because we have the option to not only chose our own Doctors but also which health care system to go to. In the north east we are fortunate to have many great Hospitals in Boston, MA. Only about 1,000 new cases of Pancreatic cancer are reported each year in the united States. The chances of me being alive is less than 1%. Under Obama care it would be 0%.
    In the Private sector it is worth fighting even for a 1% chance of success. Under Obamacare the department of Motor vehicles would say sorry Charlie we can’t help you but we do have Dr. Kevorkian here to take care of your final needs.

  • http://www.meetup.com/capitalarea912/ Richard A. Bloom

    I am a 6 year+ survivor of Pancreatic cancer because we have the option to not only chose our own Doctors but also which health care system to go to. In the north east we are fortunate to have many great Hospitals in Boston, MA. Only about 1,000 new cases of Pancreatic cancer are reported each year in the united States. The chances of me being alive is less than 1%. Under Obama care it would be 0%.
    In the Private sector it is worth fighting even for a 1% chance of success. Under Obamacare the department of Motor vehicles would say sorry Charlie we can’t help you but we do have Dr. Kevorkian here to take care of your final needs.

  • http://www.meetup.com/capitalarea912/ Richard A. Bloom

    I am a 6 year+ survivor of Pancreatic cancer because we have the option to not only chose our own Doctors but also which health care system to go to. In the north east we are fortunate to have many great Hospitals in Boston, MA. Only about 1,000 new cases of Pancreatic cancer are reported each year in the united States. The chances of me being alive is less than 1%. Under Obama care it would be 0%.
    In the Private sector it is worth fighting even for a 1% chance of success. Under Obamacare the department of Motor vehicles would say sorry Charlie we can’t help you but we do have Dr. Kevorkian here to take care of your final needs.

Previous post:

Next post: